Page Watch: Click

A screenshot from Politico's "Click," an offbeat political aggregator.

Political media sources tend to be on the serious side, and well they should be. The problems facing our nation are no laughing matter, from budget battles to wars abroad. Yet any heavy issues require a degree of levity and . Enter Politico’s Click, the “premier destination for news and gossip on D.C.’s social scene” and the feature of this chapter of PW’s Page Watch.

 

  • The lead is a multi-photo collage of five of the “The Week In One-Liners,” including White House Adviser David Plouffe, former Florida governor
    Charlie Crist, President Obama, and of course, Donald Trump. 14 articles, each with a large blue headline and image, populate the page beneath.
  • Some of these articles include a video as well, such as a clip from Congressman Dennis Kucinich as a ventriloquist on “The Daily Show.” There’s even a weekly Politico Playback video which has an about two-minute collection from “The Best in Late-Night TV.”
  • Another weekly feature is “By the Numbers,” which highlights some key numerical figures from the week in politics and an accompanying story. For example: “3: The number of days lawmakers had to read the fine print in the compromise cutting $38 billion from the current year’s budget.”
  • The fun continues in the archives under “More Click,” which shows the next 20 articles plus over 340 more pages of material.
  • The right-side of the page has more features, including the top 6 “Most Popular Clicks;” social media tie-ins with the “Tweet of the Moment” and buttons to “Get Your Clicks” on Facebook, Twitter and RSS; “Quick Clicks” with external political links; The Scene with social and cultural events around Washington and a form to submit anonymous tips; and a Click Poll to accompany a chosen story,
All told, “Click” provides a breath of fresh air in the dark, cloudy world of politics and does with a good use of multimedia.
NEXT: THE FINAL OFFICIAL POST OF PW
With the semester coming to an end, an overall review of Politico is on order, though this will not be the end of PW.

Politico and the Shutdown Showdown

A screenshot of one of Politico's many pages dedicated to the 11th-hour budget deal.

As the dust settles from the budget deal that averted a government shutdown, it is worth examining Politico’s multimedia coverage of the shutdown showdown that nearly brought the first stoppage in over a decade.

  • In a remarkably wide scope, there were no less than 20 articles covering many different angles of the unfolding drama and the agreement, from the winners and losers to how the 2012 candidates reacted.
  • One interesting story in particular from Click (a subpage that PW will cover next) included a moment in the proceedings where Congresswoman Donna Edwards quoted a song by The Whites Stripes, “Effect and Cause,” in describing the conditions leading to a shutdown. The piece includes a video of the testimony as well as a link to the song itself.
  • Several other  videos in the aftermath of the deal are posted on the site, including the responses of Speaker of the House John Boehner, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, and, of course, President Obama. The list was updated Sunday following appearances on talk shows by Sen. Chuck Schumer, Rep. Mike Pence and others.
  • A slideshow of photos leading up to the deal showed the tension rising between the parties and more images from the deal should be added as well.

In one of the biggest political stories of the year, Politico delivered clear and cohesive coverage. Stay tuned to see how the aftermath of the deal unfolds.


Page Watch: Congress

Politico pulls away the curtain on Congress. | Photo courtesy Flickr user Sean Stayte

In this installment of Page Watch, we examine Politico’s coverage on Congress. The legislative branch of government has been seemingly cast aside in the era of executive power, especially in the case of President Obama’s decision on Libya. But as the national budget continues to dominate headlines and merit attention, Congress is still a relevant player in the political field and Politico’s subpage dedicated to the bicameral chambers is worth a look.

  • The lead features the main story accompanied by a picture, such an an article about GOP House Leader John Boehner’s “moment of truth” in the budget deal negotiations. In this case, several videos of Boehner and other GOP members are included as well.
  • Among the other articles is a weekly “Sunday talk show tip sheet” lays out an organized rundown of scheduled appearances of major political players on This Week, Face the Nation, Meet the Press, and other programs.
  • Below the articles is a “Congressional Scorecard” which lists how many Democrats, Republicans and Independents reside in the House of Representatives and the Senate. A quick reminder of the political roster as it stands after the 2010 midterm elections and a handy counter for the party lines in both chambers.
  • Stories more than 2 days old are relegated below the scorecard to a “More Congress News” section, with just headlines.
  • Historical and contextual resources fill out the rest of the page. First, there is a list of important links related to Congress, such as the official sites of the House and Senate, as well as the Federal Election Commission and Library of Congress. The staff Politico writers are also listed, though only by name.

    Screenshot of Politico: Congress, April 3.

  • An interesting feature of the site is This Day in Congress, highlighting significant events in congressional history, such as Abigail Adams’ feminist initiative in 1776. However, this is updated sporadically during the week, perhaps because a landmark or anniversary doesn’t happen every day.
  • Also on the negative side, the site is lacking a blog of easy-to-read and essential content, as well as social media connections for sharing the site.

All told, the page is a good collection and presentation of congressional coverage, though an easier interface and more would help make it even better.

NEXT ON PAGE WATCH: POLITICO CLICK


Politico Has March Madness

March Madness has infected Washington. | Courtesy Flickr user mvongrue

It’s NCAA tournament time and even Washington is getting in on the action.  Politico has published a couple of articles covering politicians’ participation in March Madness.

First, President Barack Obama has been questioned by members of the media for filling out a bracket with his picks and taking time on ESPN’s Sportscenter to do so, rather than focus on the multitude of issues at home and abroad. Politico covered the story, called “W.H. responds to bracket gripes.” White House Press Secretary Jay Carney answered NBC News’ Mike Viqueria, “There are crises all the time, for every president.”

And Obama was not alone in getting caught up in the basketball action. Politico’s Amie Parnes writes, “As happens every year when March rolls around, Washington has become a mini-Vegas,” and compiles a nice round-up of various political figures and their Final Four choices in the tournament. These include Carney himself and Democratic National Committee Press Secretary Hari Sevugan. The GOP is in on the fun as well, with Tony Fratto, former deputy White House press secretary under George W. Bush and and Republican strategist and former RNC spokesman Doug Heye. Senator Kay Hagan (D-SC) even has a video on YouTube challenging players to beat her picks.

It’s good to see that even our leaders can be a little like us, and Politico does a good job in presenting it. Happy March Madness, one and all.